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Ron's Vintage Guitars
Welcome to Ron's Vintage!
 
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Rickenbacker
Early and Prototypes
Combos and Tulip Body Models
Capris
F-Bodies
'60s Solidbodies
Export Models
1964-69 6-strings
1964-69 12-strings
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Rickenbacker Guitars  (NOTE: Some images will enlarge when clicked again)

 
Early and Prototypes

1937 Ken Roberts model; dark Brown woodgrain finish; single “horseshoe” type pickup with Kauffman vibrola and metal “Rickenbacher” (with an “h”) badge on pearloid headstock veneer.  All original with OHSC.

1957 Rickenbacker 365 Capri Prototype in Autumnglo.  This guitar was one of the first of a handful of prototype full-scale Capri models made by Rickenbacker in 1957.  It has an extremely attractive flame-maple butcher-block style top with single gold pickguard, Combo-style pickup selector switch and tone selector switch, volume and tone knobs and a Kauffman vibrola. Unlike the full scale Capris that followed, it is distinguished by a Combo-style wiring and one-piece neck with no middle “walnut” stripe, an extra-long “crescent” soundhole, first introduced on this guitar, and a wooden cap on the neck heel that extends over the body binding.  The long soundhole was shortened later in 1958.  This guitar is identified as a 1957 model and depicted in a color photo on page 104 of “The Complete History of Rickenbacker Guitars” (1987) by Richard R. Smith.  This guitar is in near-mint original condition with its OHSC.

1957 Rickenbacker 365 Capri Prototype in Autumn Gold. Another guitar from the early run of a few prototype full-scale Capri models made by Rickenbacker in 1957. It has all the features of its brother just above; however, it appears that the original finish was removed and the body and neck has been professionally refinished in a Autumn Gold (a transitional finish color between Autumnglo and Fireglo). Note the flame-maple butcher-block style 11-piece top.  This guitar has a single gold pickguard, Combo-style pickup selector and tone selector switches, volume and tone knobs and a Kauffman vibrola. This early example also has a one-piece neck with no middle “walnut” stripe, an extra-long “crescent” soundhole and a wooden cap on the neck heel that extends over the body binding.  Apart from the pro refinish, this guitar is in original condition with period correct components and an OHSC.

1958 Rickenbacker 325/850 “Polynesian” One-off.  This one-of-a-kind guitar was developed in late 1957 and likely designed by Rickenbacker designer Roger Rossmeisl, combining features of the 325 Capri and the Combo 850, and with no serial number on the elongated jackplate.  This “transitional” Rickenbacker guitar has features found on the Combo 850 model, such as the “German carve” indent on the front of the body.  However it also has a short-scale set-neck, semi-hollow body, thin ply back and a 3-pickup “toaster-top” configuration in keeping with the 325 Capri series that immediately followed it.  The Polynesian could be said to be the first model 325 made by Rickenbacker. It was so named because it was initially played by a member of a group called the “Polynesians.” See page 147 of  “The Complete History of Rickenbacker Guitars” (1987) by Richard R. Smith for more information. This guitar is in near-mint original condition with its original HSC.

1958 Rickenbacker Capri 325 Autumn Gold – Short Neck Long Body.  This is one of three “Longbody” Capri  prototypes produced by Rickenbacker during the R&D stages of the Capri concept in late 1957.  Guitar features a short-scale neck on an elongated semi-hollow body, which is made of several pieces of figured wood laminated together “butcher-block” style.  Its unusual length required a short “extension” piece to complete the bass horn.  The production 325 guitars that followed had a body that was shorter by about 1.5 to 2.0 inches.  The serial no. stamped in the elongated jackplate is, a few numbers away from John Lennon’s V81 325 Capri.  See additional detailed photos and information regarding this particular guitar on pages 20-21 of “Rickenbacker, Pioneer of the Electric Guitar” (1995) published by Rittor Music, Japan. This guitar is in near-mint original condition with its original HSC.

1958 Rickenbacker Capri 325 in Two-Tone Brown.  This is one of the approximately 30 model 325 guitars made by Rickenbacker in 1958, and has survived in excellent shape with its original Two-Tone Brown finish.  Like the Polynesian and the Longbody Capri, above, it has one pickup selector switch, two knobs and a single pickguard; unlike them, it has the f-hole soundhole, which was featured on most 325s of that era. This guitar was one of the last of the model 325s made in 1958 and is in excellent original condition with its OHSC.

   
 
 
Combos and Tulip Body Models

1956 Rickenbacker Combo 600 in Turquoise; early model with gold metal pickguard and single-coil pickup; some finish checking on body. Bolt-on neck with semi-hollow body construction.  All original with OHSC.

1957 Rickenbacker Combo 800 in White; early model with double-coil pickup; burnished metal pickguard may not be original. 
Otherwise all original with OHSC.

1958 Rickenbacker Combo 600 in Fireglo with anodized black metal pickguard and single-coil pickup; some finish checking on body. Bolt-on neck with semi-hollow body construction.  With OHSC.

1956 Rickenbacker Combo 400 in Brown; early solid body model with neck-through construction, gold metal pickguard and early single-coil pickup in neck position.  All original with OHSC. 

1957 Rickenbacker Combo 400 in Jet Black (later “Jetglo”); early solid body model with gold metal pickguard and early single-coil pickup in neck position.  All original with OHSC.

1957 Rickenbacker Combo 450
in Cloverfield Green; rare color; early solid body model with gold metal pickguard and two single-coil “toaster” pickups in bridge and neck positions.  All original with OHSC.

1960 Rickenbacker Combo 450 in Fireglo with gold metal pickguard and silver metal truss rod cover stamped with “Rickenbacker” logo in excellent condition.  All original with OHSC.

1960 Rickenbacker Combo 450
in Mapleglo with silver metal pickguard and silver metal stamped TRC in excellent condition.  All original with OHSC.

1957 Rickenbacker 950 Tulip in Jet Black.  Along with the early Combo 450 model, the short-scale model 950 is one of the few Rickenbacker guitars with two pickups but one volume and one tone control.  The middle knob is a pickup selector switch.  This early “Tulip” model – so called because of the shape of the body horns – has the “sax strap” ring and hook.  This particular guitar also comes with the sax strap (see photo).  In excellent shape with OHSC.

1958 Rickenbacker 1000 Tulip in Jet Black.  This short-scale model has the least frets of all the short-scale models; as opposed to the 900, 950 and 310-325 models which were short scale with 21 frets, this model is short scale with 18 frets.  The badge on the bass horn is a custom nameplate from a previous owner. In excellent shape with OHSC.

1959 Rickenbacker 950 Tulip in Brown.  This transitional 950 is finished in a rare non-traditional dark reddish brown color with a slight burst effect on the sides.  In excellent shape with OHSC.

1960 Rickenbacker 950 Tulip in Fireglo.  This guitar has a rare “matte” Fireglo finish found on some early 1960 models (see 330F Fireglo 1960, above).  It is all original with a short-scale neck, “tulip” body (last produced in 1960) metal truss rod cover and plastic Kluson tuner buttons.  It also has the “sax strap” ring on the back, common to the 400-series Combo models. In excellent shape with OHSC.

   
 

 

Capris

1958 Rickenbacker Capri 330 in Mapleglo; original body finish, neck refinished; refretted padauk fretboard; roller bridge and trapeze tailpiece; original case.

1958 Rickenbacker Capri 335
in Autumnglo; body-only refinish; otherwise all original with roller bridge and trapeze tailpiece; early silver tolex case.

1958 Rickenbacker Capri 360 in Autumnglo; beautiful figuring in maple woodgrain on body front; shows playing wear on body and neck; no cracks or breaks.  All original with gray “elephant-hide” covered OHSC with red lining in good condition.  Formerly owned and played by Mitch Easter.

1958 Rickenbacker Capri 365 in early Fireglo finish; beautiful ribbon-flamed alder on body front; shows slight playing wear; no cracks or breaks.  All original with roller bridge and early Ac’cent vibrola with badge.  Potentiometer dates are 48th week of 1958.  Gray OHSC with red lining in very good condition. 

1959 Rickenbacker Capri 365
in beautiful shade of burgundy-tinged Fireglo finish; MINT museum-quality guitar looks like it was made yesterday; not a nick, ding, scratch or swirl on it.  This one-owner guitar was unplayed and under the bed for 50 years; Ac’cent vibrola.  All original with OHSC also in mint condition.

1959 Rickenbacker Capri 335 in a Tomato Red burst with a beautiful flamey neck; this is a very lightweight guitar in excellent original condition.  Kauffman vibrola, roller bridge.  OHSC.

1959 Rickenbacker Capri 345 in Fireglo with extremely rare Mahogany body with distinct ribbon flame; significant finish wear on back of neck; Kauffman vibrola.  All original with OHSC.

1959 Rickenbacker Capri 360 in Autumnglo all original with gray “elephant-hide” covered OHSC with red lining in good condition.

1959 Rickenbacker Capri 365 in nicely ambered Fireglo, with highly flamed 3-piece maple neck with original finish; early Ac’cent vibrola and silver HSC.

1959 Rickenbacker Capri 375 restored and refinished to a beautiful shade of Autumnglo/Fireglo by Larry Davis in 2009.  Guitar body, flamed 3-piece maple neck and electronics original.  Restored with neck reset, new repro Kluson tuners, toaster pickup covers and Kauffman vibrola; restoration included new fingerboard with crushed pearl inlays; period-correct HSC. 

1960 Rickenbacker Capri 360 in beautiful Fireglo finish; guitar is in very nice shape with slight weatherchecking on back bottom; original trapeze tailpiece; formerly in personal collection of Dave Rogers of Dave’s Guitar Shop.  All original with OHSC.

1960 Rickenbacker Capri 365 in deep red ambered Fireglo; very clean guitar in very nice shape, showing very little playing wear; with roller bridge and Kauffman vibrola.  All original with OHSC.   

1960 Rickenbacker Capri 365 refinished in Jetglo.  If John Lennon had played a full-scale Capri, this might well have been his choice.  This guitar came to me stripped of its original finish and redone in a mottled brown color.   I had it professionally refinished Jetglo in nitrocellulose.  Apart from the body refinish, this guitar is in original condition, all original hardware and electronics with triangle fretboard inlays and early Ac’cent vibola.  OHSC.

1961 Rickenbacker “New Capri” 365
in near-mint condition; Fireglo finish; closely resembles guitar on cover of “Rittor Rickenbacker” book, except this example has the original oven knobs; roller bridge with Ac’cent vibrola and crushed pearl inlays, introduced on this model and not seen again until 1964. All original with OHSC.   

1961 Rickenbacker "New Capri" 365 in Mapleglo finish; roller bridge with Ac’cent vibrola, crushed pearl inlays. Excellent condition with OHSC.

1961 Rickenbacker “New Capri” extremely rare near-mint 330 in deep, deep red Fireglo with flamed maple 3-piece neck; small pro-repaired expansion crack in lower front body edge by end strap-button; trapeze tailpiece.  This guitar (serial # AE) is unique in that 1) it may be the first of the “New Capri” body style in the 330 model, 2) it may be one of the first Ricks to sport the 5th “blend” knob and 3) it has a factory-bound neck, not standard on the 330 model.  All original with OHSC.

1963 Rickenbacker “New Capri” 375 in near-mint condition; beautiful and rare three-pickup version with Autumnglo finish; Ac’cent vibrola and roller bridge, oven knobs, gold guards and TRC.  Silver OHSC.

1963 Rickenbacker “New Capri” 365
in near-mint condition; beautiful and rare two-pickup version with Autumnglo finish, having pearloid-button Van Ghent tuners and the then-new “Sceusa” neck, a patented asymmetrical neck design – thicker on the bass side, thinner on the treble side.  This design provided a more “natural” fit for the player’s hand, making barre chording easier.  A few Rickenbacker guitars in the early-to-mid ‘60s were produced with the Sceusa neck; it was then discontinued. (See Rittor Music book, page 95.)  Ac’cent vibrola and roller bridge, oven knobs, gold guards and TRC.  Silver OHSC.

   
 
 
Full Bodied Guitars – “F” Model

1958 Rickenbacker 335F full bodied guitar in a dark shade of Autumnglo.  Black neck binding and fine finish checking throughout; early serial no. 2V183; believed to be one of three 330F models produced in 1958; possibly the one pictured on page 184 of Richard Smith book. This extremely rare guitar rests in a period-correct archtop HSC that fits perfectly.

1960 Rickenbacker 330F in Fireglo.  This guitar is a very clean example in a rich Fireglo finish with a few dings around the unbound edges.  All original with gray OHSC.

1959 Rickenbacker 360F in Mapleglo with tortoiseshell binding.  This unique guitar has several unusual features and may have been a custom order.  Note the shark-fin inlay at the first fret, the tortoise body binding the dramatically flamed maple front and the flamed maple neck.  All original with OHSC.

1960 Rickenbacker 360F full-bodied guitar in a rich shade of Fireglo; possible refinish or overspray on back of neck; rest of finish original; transitional guitar: checkered binding on body front, white/black binding on body back; weatherchecking on body front and back; some chipping due to weatherchecking around edges.  This rare guitar is all original with gray OHSC.

1960 Rickenbacker 360F full-bodied guitar in Mapleglo; slight playing wear on back of neck; finish otherwise excellent with minimal checking; unusual checkered binding on both body front and back.  This exceptionally rare guitar is all original with silver OHSC.

1960 Rickenbacker 375F
full-bodied guitar in Mapleglo; this guitar is in collector-quality condition with only barely detectable wear on the original un-lacquered rosewood fingerboard; checkered binding on body front and back.  I have never seen another one like this; three original toaster pickups with unusual “musical notes” Ac’cent vibrola and roller bridge.  This exceptionally rare guitar is all original with gray OHSC. 

1964 Rickenbacker 365F full-bodied guitar in Mapleglo.  This unusual guitar appears in the time warp in between the “old style” F-body models, ending in 1961-62 and the “new style” F-body models beginning around 1966/67.  It definitely has an “old style” body with the old-style pearloid fretboard inlays; however, both sides of the double-bound body are done up in a unique “white-over-black” two-layered binding seldom seen on a Rickenbacker instrument before or since.  The white pickguard and truss rod cover are original, the potentiometers date to mid-1964 as does the serial number on the jackplate, which has but a single output without Ric-O-Sound.  Comes with an “old sytle” musical note Ac’cent vibrola and black HSC.

1967 Rickenbacker 360F
full-bodied guitar in Fireglo.  This guitar has been much-photographed and is a stunning example of this model in near mint condition with highly-figured maple front and back with checkered binding on both sides and long "R" tailpiece.  This rare guitar is all original with OHSC.  

1967 Rickenbacker 370F in Fireglo.  This guitar is a very clean example in a rich Fireglo finish with an amazing back of highly flamed bookmatched maple, one of the rarest of the mid-‘60s “F”-bodied models.  All original with gray OHSC.

1967 Rickenbacker 360F-12 full-bodied guitar in Fireglo finish.  This near-mint guitar is an early mid-‘60s “F” body model in 12-string configuration.  All original with black OHSC.   

1968 Rickenbacker 360F
full-bodied guitar in Jetglo. This is one of the few full-bodied “F” series guitar produced by Rickenbacker in the Jetglo finish.  The guitar is all original and in excellent condition with a rectangular black HSC with a large “Rickenbacker” metal badge on the case top.           
   
 
 
 
60’s Solidbodies

Rickenbacker 1961 model 425 full-scale solidbody in Fireglo with metal truss rod cover stamped “Rickenbacker.”  Shows playing wear and slight rusting on bridgeplate.  All original with OHSC.    

Rickenbacker 1961 model 460 in Fireglo with full-width crushed pearl fretboard inlays and body binding. Gold truss rod cover and plastic pickguard.  Small “Matt Umanov Guitars” decal on headstock back.  All original with OHSC.   

Rickenbacker 1962 model 460 in Fireglo. Note the transition to white pickguard and truss rod cover of this 1962 model as contrasted with the gold appointments of the 1961 model 460 directly above.  Also different are the mother of pearl triangle inlays on this guitar, which replaced the crushed pearl inlays on its 1961 counterpart.  Comes with original OHSC.

Rickenbacker 1962 model 625 in Fireglo.  This rare and well-preserved guitar has neck-thru construction common to many Rick solidbody guitars and is finished in Fireglo with pearloid full-with inlays and early ‘60s “vintage” control knobs.  All original with transitional red-lined silver tolex case.

Rickenbacker 1964 model 625 in Jetglo.  This deluxe solidbody guitar has been refinished but is otherwise all original with full-with crushed-pearl inlays.  Comes with OHSC.

Rickenbacker 1965 model 615 in Fireglo.  This solidbody guitar is the twin of the export model 1995 discussed below.  All original with OHSC.

Rickenbacker 1963 model 460 in Mapleglo with full-width inlays, body binding, original white plastic pickguard and TRC; original Van Ghent tuners -- pearloid knobs with “Harley Tank” gear covers on headstock back; possible body and neck refinish with slight staining on back.  Excellent condition with OHSC.    

Rickenbacker 1964 model 425
full-scale solidbody in Mapleglo.  Nice shape with OHSC.  

Rickenbacker 1964 model 425
full-scale solidbody in deep red Fireglo finish with unusual blank white crescent TRC with metal “Electro” badge added; does “neck thru” construction make this a Rickenbacker 425 v. an Electro ES-17?  Could be either, I guess -- or both.  Excellent shape with brown OHSC.    

Rickenbacker 1965 Electro model ES-16
short-scale guitar in Fireglo.  Same features as 425/ES-17 except short-scale.  Excellent shape, all original with brown OHSC.  

Rickenbacker 1965 model 450-12
in Mapleglo finish.  This 12-string guitar plays nicely and is light as a feather.  All original with black OHSC.       

Rickenbacker 1966 model 450-12 in Fireglo finish.  This 12-string guitar plays nicely and is in excellent shape.  All original with silver vintage reissue HSC.   
   
 
 
Export Models

Rickenbacker 1964 model 1995 Rose Morris solidbody export (corresponding non-export model is 615). Very nicely aged Fireglo finish with vintage solid black knobs with white mark; shows some playing wear on fretboard and back of neck.  All original with OHSC.

Rickenbacker 1964 model 1999 bass.  Along with a lineup of guitars produced for export to Rose Morris in the UK, Rickenbacker produced this “S” model export bass.  Rose Morris designated it as the model 1999.  In Rickenbacker terms, it was the same as a model 4001S, “S” standing for “Standard,” with no body binding and dot neck, vs. the “Deluxe” model 4001, with checkered body binding and crushed pearl fretboard inlays. (For examples of the Deluxe models, see “Vintage Basses,” below). The model 1999 is highly desirable because of its use by many “British Invasion” artists in the mid-1960s and its relatively limited production.  The model also received a big boost later on when artists like Paul McCartney and Chris Squire of Yes began using their 4001S and 1999 models to add the distinctive Rick “clank” sound to their repertoire.  That sound is in part attributed to the horseshoe bridge pickup found on all Rick 4000/1 series basses through circa 1968.

Rickenbacker 1965 export model 1993-12 in Fireglo finish.  Very rare and desirable 12-string with bound body, “F” soundhole and unbound fretboard with dot markers; this is the type of Rick 12 played by Pete Townshend and other Brit Invasion guitar players.  This guitar had a neck repair that is at least 15 years old and is very solid, actually giving a bit more heft to the neck and balance to the guitar.  Loudest, clearest Rick 12er I’ve ever played.  Excepting neck repair, all original with OHSC – with “Rickenbacker” metal badge on case, characteristic of guitars exported to Rose Morris dealership in UK.

Rickenbacker 1964 model 1993-12 in Fireglo  Another 12-string with bound body, “F” soundhole and unbound fretboard with dot markers; this guitar was likely intended for export to the UK.  Note the early 12-string “short” truss rod cover on this August 1964  model, compared to the one on the prior 1965 example.  This early model has the “Rickenbacker” metal badge on its silver tolex case. 

Rickenbacker 1966 export model 1997
(like 335 except “F” soundhole) in unusual “Redburst” finish.  Guitar shows playing wear and is all original with an original silver Rickenbacker case that has been custom-lined with light-green plush material.

Rickenbacker 1967 export model 1998
(like a 345 model with “F” soundhole) in Fireglo finish, played by the likes of Pete Townshend and other Brit Invaders.  This model has a roler bridge, three toaster pickups and an Ac’cent vibrola.  All original with OHSC.

Rickenbacker 1967 export model 365S in Fireglo.  This unusual model was one of several exported to Italy as a 360-12 string with an “F” soundhole.  These were converted by the distributor to 6-string guitars by the addition of black plastic inserts that covered the octave channels and tuner holes in the top and sides of the headstock, and the addition of a 6-string nut, bridge and Ac’cent tailpiece.   All original with OHSC.

   
 
 
1964-1970  6-String Guitars

1964 Rickenbacker 310 in Fireglo.  Another rare model which can be viewed as the more popular 325 or 1996 (export) model minus the middle pickup and vibrato unit.   All else is the same: f-hole, single-line Kluson tuners, short-scale neck.  A lightweight guitar that’s fun to play and has been played.  OHSC.

Rickenbacker 1965 model 365 O.S.
(“old style”) in Fireglo with binding on body front and back.  Guitar has been played but is in very nice shape with usual surface impressions and dings but nothing through to the wood.  All original with OHSC.   

Rickenbacker 1965 model 365
in Mapleglo with Van Ghent tuners – pearloid knobs with “Harley Tank” gear covers on headstock back.  This early 1965 guitar (serial # EA) has a roller bridge and Ac’cent vibrola and closely resembles the guitar played by the lead player, Beau Charles, of the Knickerbockers as seen on the YouTube video of their recording, “Lies,” made in late 1965.  Shows normal playing wear with some pitting to fretboard.  All original with OHSC.  

Rickenbacker 1965 model 360
in Mapleglo in nice shape, very clean with nice figuring on back; lacquer has been removed from fretboard and refretted.   Otherwise all original with  OHSC.     

Rickenbacker 1966 model 365 O.S.
in Fireglo, double-bound with Ac’cent vibrola and temporarily sporting vintage oven knobs, gold pickguards and TRC (original white plastic and knobs are in case).  Shows playing wear.  All original with OHSC.  

Rickenbacker 1966 model 360
in Fireglo, very clean example with “R” tailpiece and toaster pickups; beautiful figuring on back; some pitting on fretboard.  All original with silver vintage reissue HSC.   

Rickenbacker 1966 model 345 in Fireglo, very clean with three toaster-top pickups and Accent vibrato.  All original with silver OHSC.

Rickenbacker 1966 model 375 O.S. in Fireglo, very clean with three toaster-top pickups, deluxe crushed pearl fretboard inlays, double-bound body and Accent vibrato.  All original with silver OHSC.

Rickenbacker 1967 model 360
in Fireglo.  This guitar is in nice condition with a lighter than usual Fireglo finish that has ambered out quite nicely.  All original with silver vintage reissue HSC.   

Rickenbacker 1967 model 330 in Mapleglo.  A very nice example of this “non-deluxe” edition Rickenbacker; shows very little playing wear; nice light flame maple front and back; slight shadow-stain on back treble-side.  All original with OHSC.

Rickenbacker 1968 model 365 in Azureglo, a dark blue finish color first introduced by Rickenbacker circa 1968.  This guitar is in excellent shape.  It has a roller bridge and Ac’cent vibrola and is all original with its silver OHSC.      

Rickenbacker 1967 model 360 in Jetglo.  This guitar has been played andhas the usual nicks and dings; also has an old expertly repaired heel crack that is stable.   Like many guitars that have been played, this one plays particularly well and has that great ‘60s Rick sound.  All original with OHSC.   

Rickenbacker 1966 model 375 in Mapleglo with roller bridge, Ac’cent vibrola and Van Ghent tuners.  Guitar is in excellent condition.  All original with OHSC.   

Rickenbacker 1967 model 375 in Jetglo.  This guitar has a roller bridge, three toaster pickups and an Ac’cent vibrola and shows normal playing wear.  All original with OHSC.  

Rickenbacker 1968 model 370 in Fireglo.  Unusual three-pickup model with “R” tailpiece is in excellent condition with a few impressions on back of neck.  All original with silver vintage reissue HSC.   

Rickenbacker 1967 model 365
refinished in Greenburst.  I acquired this guitar stripped of its original finish; it was refinished in nitrocellulose lacquer in this unusual color by Lay’s of Akron.  A real conversation piece.  Other than the refin, it’s all original with roller bridge, Ac’cent vibrola and vintage silver reissue HSC.   

Rickenbacker 1968 model 370 O.S. in Fireglo.  Unusual three-pickup double-bound model with “R” tailpiece is in excellent condition and sports a deep shade of ambered Fireglo.  All original with black OHSC.   

Rickenbacker 1968 model 370 O.S. in Mapleglo.  Three-pickup double-bound model with “R” tailpiece is in excellent condition and sports a highly figured maple top.  All original with silver OHSC.   

Rickenbacker 1968 model 365 O.S. in super-rare “Moonglo” finish.  This non-standard factory finish starts as a dark cherry at the body edge, moves to Fireglo and then amber at the very center.  I have seen two other Rickenbackers in this finish – the 1968 370 O.S. described below, and the 1968 366-12 listed under “Convertibles.”  This guitar has a roller bridge, Ac'cent vibrola and a professionally repaired slight seam separation on the back of the body that is stable and barely noticeable.  All original with silver OHSC.

Rickenbacker 1968 model 370 O.S. in Moonglo.  The finish on this guitar is a duplicate of the rare “Moonglo” finish on the 365 O.S. discussed above.  This guitar was acquired from the legendary Tatado Collection and has a deep ambered Fireglo finish distinctively darker in hue than the standard Fireglo or Autumnglo finishes.  This rare double-bound guitar is all original with silver tolex HSC.

Rickenbacker 1968 model 375 refinished in Azureglo.  When I acquired this guitar, it was refinished in Metallic Emerald and didn’t look so hot.  I had it stripped and refinished in nitrocellulose lacquer in this spiffy color by Lay’s of Akron.  Other than the refin, it appears to be all original with roller bridge, Ac’cent vibrola and OHSC.   

Rickenbacker 1968 model 365
O.S. in Burgundy finish, which became a standard finish in 1968.  This guitar is, to my knowledge, a one-of-a-kind double-bound model with Burgundy finish, roller bridge and Ac’cent vibrola, and shows slight playing wear and some finish wear to back of neck.  All original with OHSC.     

Rickenbacker 1968 model 330 in Fireglo, very clean with two toaster-top pickups and “R” tailpiece.  All original with silver OHSC

Rickenbacker 1969 model 360
O.S. in Fireglo.  According to the original owner, from whom I purchased it, this very unusual guitar was acquired from a Rickenbacker dealer as New Old Stock in 1977. The new owner corresponded with Mr. Francis Hall, then owner and president of Rickenbacker Corp., to verify its authenticity and year of manufacture.  It has been kept unplayed in its case in a climate-controlled environment and is in museum-quality condition – not a ding, scratch or a swirl mark on it.  The crushed pearl inlays of the fretboard have maintained their bright sparkle.  The finish of the guitar is a deep burgundy-tinged Fireglo burst.  All original with black OHSC with blue lining.     

Rickenbacker 1969 model 381 in Fireglo.  The model 381 was introduced in 1968.  This early production (serial # IA) model has toaster pickups (model was issued with hi-gains later in 1969) and a German-carve body front and back with checkered body binding front and back and Van Ghent tuners. This example is in excellent condition with mild weatherchecking on the finish and binding and mild finish wear.  All original with black OHSC with red lining.  

Rickenbacker 1970 model 381 in Mapleglo.  This unusual guitar was probably made especially for a trade show.  In the cavity behind the slash hole is a typed sticker from Rickenbacker Inc. stating the model and serial number of the guitar.  It is in near-mint original condition with its original Mapleglo finish, crushed pearl fretboard inlays, double bound checkered binding and toaster-top pickups. Comes with OHSC.        

   
 
 
1964 – 1970 12-String Guitars

Rickenbacker 1964 model 360-12 in a deep shade of Fireglo.  This is one of the earliest Rickenbackers made in the “new style,” introduced in 1964, with rounded-over top edge and checker-bound back. Note the early chrome-topped control knobs (with no V/T lettering), introduced in 1964. It also has the distinction of having open-back tuners, a rare feature found on some of the early 360 12-string models.  All original with silver OHSC.

Rickenbacker 1965 model 360-12 in nicely ambered Mapleglo finish with light flame in body and neck; old refinish by Barth Guitar Shop, Paul Barth, proprietor.  (Paul Barth was associated with Rickenbacker Corp. in the 1950’s.)  But for the Barth sticker in the soundhole (and the dark slots for the octave strings in the headstock), you would not suspect that this guitar had been refinished.  Other than the refin, all original with OHSC.  

Rickenbacker 1965 model 360-12 in Mapleglo; very clean early example.  Deluxe crushed-pearl inlays.  All original with silver vintage reissue HSC.     

Rickenbacker 1966 model 370-12
in Fireglo. Fretboard has been scraped and given a fresh coat of clear lacquer, allowing the original white crushed pearl inlays to show through. Except for the addition of a 12-saddle RIC bridge, guitar is all original with OHSC.    

Rickenbacker 1967 model 330-12 in Mapleglo.  A nice example of this model with nice light flame in the body front.  One photo shows this guitar with its companion 1967 330 in Mapleglo. All original with OHSC.   

Rickenbacker 1968 model 330-12
in Fireglo with a beautiful quilted maple top and unusual soundhole that appears to be bound but has been professionally trimmed in white paint.  There’s no way to tell if this was a factory treatment or not, but likely it was not.  The photos speak for themselves.  This guitar has been beautifully preserved and shows only minor playing wear, though it has light finish checking throughout.  It plays very nicely and comes in a black OHSC with red lining.  

Rickenbacker 1968 model 360-12 O.S. in Jetglo.  Here is a rare double-bound 12-string in original Jetglo finish, which visually really sets off the crushed pearl fretboard inlays.  All original with black tolex OHSC.     

Rickenbacker 1970 model 360-12 O.S. in Jetglo – left-handed model.  Well they don’t get much rarer than this!  Here is the counterpart to the 360-12 O.S. guitar above, except in the very rare left-handed version.  No doubt this was a custom order, as left-handed double-bound Rickenbackers from this era are seldom seen.  All original with silver tolex OHSC.

   
 

 

Convertibles

Rickenbacker 1966 model 366-12 in Mapleglo.  This is one of the first of the “converter comb” models produced by Rickenbacker in late 1966. It is essentially a 360-12 with a mechanism (the converter comb and arm assembly) that allows the player to dampen or mute the octave strings by engaging them with a pull-down metal comb.  Although intriguing in design, it is somewhat impractical to play as a 6 string guitar, and many of this model have had the converter mechanism removed over the years.  Without the comb engaged, this plays and sounds like a 12-string of the same era, but with a bit more interior wood bracing to accommodate the converter hardware.  

Rickenbacker 1966 model 366-12 in Mapleglo.  This is identical to the preceding guitar except this example is in near mint condition with a stunning birdseye-flamed maple back.  According to the Richard Smith book, only two of this model were produced in 1966 in Mapleglo finish.  If so, these are those – see them together in photo.  All original with OHSC.  

Rickenbacker 1967 model 366-12 O.S. in Mapleglo. This extremely rare guitar is one of the few “converter comb” models issued by Rickenbacker as a double-bound deluxe model. I have seen only two others of this model in the O.S. or WB style, a 1967 Fireglo and a 1967 Autumnglo (see both, below).  Near mint and all original with OHSC.    

Rickenbacker 1967 model 366-12 O.S. in Autumnglo. Also known as a "WBBS" (with binding both sides) model. 
In excellent condition. Silver OHSC.          

Rickenbacker 1967 model 366-12 O.S. in Fireglo.  In near mint condition, no playing wear. Silver OHSC.

Rickenbacker 1968 model 366-12 in Fireglo.  This near-mint example of this unusual guitar is all original. Black OHSC.  

Rickenbacker 1968 model 366-12 in super-rare “Moonglo” finish (see 365 O.S. in same finish, above).  A very nice example in excellent condition with minor finish wear.  Silver OHSC.  

Rickenbacker 1967 model 376-12 in Fireglo finish.  This possibly unique guitar appears to have left the factory with a middle pickup placed just below the converter mechanism.  I have never seen another three-pickup convertible 12-string.  This example has an old pro-repaired headstock crack which has settled and does not affect playing or tuning; otherwise in excellent condition with minor finish wear.  Silver OHSC.  

Rickenbacker 1968 model 336-12 in Mapleglo.  The 336-12 was the 330 series version of the “converter comb” 12-string guitar; this example is very clean with nice figuring on the back.  All original with OHSC.   

Rickenbacker 1968 model 336-12 in Fireglo.  Another example of the converter-comb concept applied to a 330-12 guitar. Light playing wear.  All original with OHSC.  

Rickenbacker 1968 model 336-12 in Azureglo.  An example of the converter-comb concept applied to a 330-12 guitar in super-rare Azureglo finish.  The rarity of this finish on this model could make it one-of-a-kind.  Light playing wear.  All original with OHSC.  

Rickenbacker 1968 model 456-12 in Burgundy.  This rare guitar – which is essentially the converter-comb version of the 450-12 – may be a one-of-a-kind in Burgundy finish; if so, it could be the Burgundy 456-12 pictured in the 1968 Rickenbacker color catalog.  Shows some playing wear and is all original with silver OHSC.   

   
 
 
Other Instruments

Rickenbacker 1968 model 6005 Banjoline tenor banjo-style instrument in Mapleglo finish.  This rare instrument was developed by Rickenbacker in conjunction with Eddie Peabody, whose name appears on the truss rod cover.   It has 6 strings, two pairs and two singles, and a very thin banjo style neck, along with a special roller bridge and Ac’cent vibrola.  The body style of the 6005 Banjoline resembles that of a 360 model, with rounded front body edge and checkered binding on back and bound neck, though without deluxe fretboard inlays.  This excellent example is all original with black OHSC.   

Rickenbacker 1969 model 6006 Banjoline in Fireglo.  The model 6006 Banjoline has a 381-style body with German carve and checkered binding on body front; however, there is no carve and plain binding on the back; has crushed-pearl fretboard inlays, special roller bridge and Ac’cent vibrola. The model 6006 Banjoline is one of the few Rickenbacker production instrument with a checker-bound headstock.  This near-mint example is all original with black OHSC.  

Rickenbacker 1968 model 6006 Banjoline in Mapleglo.  This example has substantially the same features as the Fireglo model 6006 Banjoline except with a Mapleglo finish and slight variation on the screen print of the headstock logo.  This near-mint example was acquired from the Tatado Collection and is all original with black OHSC.  

Rickenbacker 1971 model 370 in Fireglo with rare bound headstock, which was a feature offered on the 360 and 370 models for a brief time in the early 1970s.  This transitional guitar has features from the '60s:  full-width crushed pearl inlays and checkered body binding; and features from the '70s:  early-design hi-gain pickups, 24-fret fingerboard (extended from 21 frets), wider headstock and factory Grover patent-pending tuners.  It was one of the last 360/370 6-string models made prior to the transition in 1972/73 to pearloid triangle inlays and plain (non-checkered) body binding in addition to 24 frets, wider headstock and non-Kluson tuners (for 6-strings), all features that have generally continued as standard.  This guitar shows some finish wear and a spot of buckle rash.  Silver HSC.

Rickenbacker 1971 model 360 Slant Fret in Fireglo with bound headstock.  In addition to being a rare bound headstock model, the nut, frets, pickups and bridge on this guitar are all slanted.  The design theory behind this short-lived model was that the slight slant of the bass-side frets toward the guitar body would more naturally fit the hand and allow for more comfortable, accurate fretting of the guitar.  Slant-fret Ricks were only produced in the early 1970s. This particular example has Kluson tuners, checker-bound back, crushed pearl inlays and early hi-gain pickups.  All original with OHSC.

Rickenbacker 1973 model 360-12 in Burgundyglo.  This rare transitional model has late ‘60s features generally not found on post-1971 12-string models, including full-width crushed pearl fretboard inlays, toaster-top pickups and 21-fret neck.  In addition, Burgundyglo is a rare finish color for this period.  Comes with special-order brass nut and black, magenta-fabric lined OHSC.

   
 
 
Vintage Bass Guitars

Rickenbacker 1965 model 4005 bass guitar in Mapleglo finish.  This is one of the first ones made in 1965, the first year of production for this model; shows normal playing wear, including some finish wear at arm rest and back of neck. All original with silver OHSC.  

Rickenbacker 1966 model 4005
WB bass guitar in Fireglo.  The double-bound body makes this bass guitar especially rare.  In very fine condition; the neck was replaced at some point in its life, apparently by the factory after 1970; the triangle inlays were recently replaced with crushed pearl inlays and the neck refinished by noted Rickenbacker luthier Paul Wilczynski.  Comes with non-original Black HSC that fits the bass perfectly.  

Rickenbacker 1966 model 4005 WB bass guitar in Mapleglo.  This rare double-bound instrument has been professionally refinished in its original Mapleglo, except for the fretboard which has the original finish and wide “crushed pearl” inlays.  A stunning example with some flamed maple showing in the body.  Custom-made Armitage silver HSC. 

Rickenbacker 1967 model 4005 bass guitar in Jetglo.  This instrument is finished in Jetglo, last seen as a standard Combo finish in 1958 and re-introduced to the standard RIC color spectrum in 1967.  This bass shows some playing wear and comes with original silver HSC.

Rickenbacker 1967 model 4005 bass guitar in Fireglo.  This example of Rick’s only semi-hollow bass model is in near mint condition with strong Fireglo color throughout.  All original with black OHSC.  The model 4005 was produced in limited numbers and eventually phased out of the Rickenbacker lineup in the early 1980s.

Rickenbacker 1967 model 4001 solidbody bass guitar in Fireglo. This very fine example is in near mint all original condition with original horseshoe bridge pickup, crushed pearl fretboard inlays and walnut headstock wings.  Rickenbacker solidbody basses such as this 4001 deluxe model were produced in modest numbers in the mid-1960s.  It is unusual to find one in such unsullied shape as this.  With silver tolex OHSC in near mint condition.    

Rickenbacker 1968 model 4001 solidbody bass guitar in Mapleglo.  This example is in excellent condition and has the “deluxe” appointments of crushed pearl  inlays, checkered body binding, bound neck and Ric-o-Sound stereo and mono output jacks. All original with black OHSC.  The model 4001 featured “neck-thru” construction where the neck – from headstock to body end – is one piece of maple with body and headstock “wings” attached to the sides.  This example also has the “horseshoe” bridge pickup, which was modeled after the pickup design patented by Rickenbacker in 1934 for its first electric guitars.   The “pickup cover” on top of the strings is actually part of the pickup and contributes to the sound.  Starting in 1969, Rickenbacker replaced the horseshoe pickup with a hi-gain in the bridge position for the 4001 model.  Although the first Rickenbacker bass was produced in 1957, 1960s Rickenbacker solidbody basses are rare.  The model 4001 basses were not very popular until the early 1970s, when various “name” artists began playing them.  Thereafter, the neck-thru model 4001/4003 became the most popular instrument in the Rickenbacker catalog, a phenomenon which has lasted until the present day.

Rickenbacker 1968 model 4001 bass guitar in Fireglo. This very fine example is in near mint all original condition with original horseshoe bridge pickup, crushed pearl fretboard inlays and walnut headstock wings.  It was purchased as a new instrument in 1968 by the original owner and acquired from his family in 2013.  He was originally a stand-up bass player in a polka band, and strung this bass with black tapewound strings, which yield a softer, more “thump-y” sound.  With silver tolex OHSC in near mint condition.

Rickenbacker late 1968 model 4001 bass guitar in Fireglo.  Here’s a 4001 that has been played and also has the new style rectangular bridge pickup surround that replaced the “tapered tail” surround on the 4000/1 models in late 1968. The rectangular treble pickup surround is still the style for the modern Rick basses today.  Although showing playing wear, this bass is a fine example which sounds great.  With silver vintage reissue silver HSC.

Rickenbacker 1969 model 4001 in Fireglo.  Beginning in late 1968 the design of the model 4001 began transitioning.  Gone was the “horseshoe” treble pickup, replaced by a “high-gain” pickup bobbin with a magnet underneath it, instead of the magnetized horseshoes on top.  Flat Grover tuners were substituted for Klusons, and were distinguishable due to the “ box” housing the tuning gears on the rear of the headstock and the wide metal bushings on the front.  This all original example dates to February 1969 and is one of the first such transition models.  In all other respects it is like its 1968 brethren, but with a very slightly shorter headstock, which would continue to “shrink” through 1972.  Also new for 1968/69 was the black tolex case with blue velveteen lining. OHSC

Rickenbacker 1972 model 4001 in Mapleglo. 1971-72 saw several changes to the model 4001, the most prominent of which was a shorter headstock.  The crushed pearl inlays would be retained until very early 1973, then replaced by pearloid inlays. 1972 also was the last year of bass models fitted with a “tug-bar,” which is the clear lucite fingerrest mounted on the pickguard next to the neck pickup. This example is in excellent shape with OHSC.

Rickenbacker 1972 model 4001 in Jetglo.  Another of the last of the Rick basses from the crushed pearl inlay era, this instrument dates to late 1972.  All original with OHSC.

Rickenbacker 1972 model 4001 in Fireglo.  Yes, we have one in Fireglo!  All original with OHSC.

Rickenbacker 1972 model 4000 in Fireglo.  Here we have something special.  In early 1972 Rickenbacker introduced the “shedua strip” – the “skunk stripe” walnut strip forming the centerpiece of the neck – in its 4000-series bass line, thus changing from a one-piece to a three-piece neck construction.  This bass guitar is a model 4000, which means it has only the treble pickup, as opposed to the 4001 model which has an additional pickup a the neck position.   In late 1972, the neck-thru construction was no longer used and the 4000 model changed to set-neck construction; that is, the neck tenon was glued into the body and does not run the entire length of the bass. (See 1975 Rickenbacker 4000) So this particular instrument is one of the few 4000 models produced – only in 1972 – with a three-piece neck-thru construction.  Pretty cool!   In very clean condition with its OHSC.

Rickenbacker 1973 model 4001 bass guitar in Fireglo.  1973 was a transition year for Rickenbacker, and there is no better illustration of this transition than the early 4001 series bass guitars made in 1973.  This February 1973 (serial # MB) model has
full-width pearloid inlays, checkered binding, a gap-tooth TP and a toaster pickup in the neck position.  All original with OHSC. 

Rickenbacker 1973 model 4001
bass guitar in Jetglo.  This April 1973 (serial # MD) model has full-width pearloid inlays, checkered binding, a gap-tooth TP and a toaster pickup in the neck position.  All original with OHSC.  

Rickenbacker 1973 model 4001 bass guitar in Burgundy.  This May 1973 (serial # ME) example has full-width pearloid inlays, checkered binding, a gap-tooth TP and a toaster pickup in the neck position.  All original with OHSC.    

Rickenbacker 1974 model 4000 bass guitar in Mapleglo. The 4000 model resembled the “S” model 4001 in that it had no body binding and dot fretboard markers; however, the 4000 series usually had a “glued in” neck, as opposed to the “neck thru” construction of the 4001 model.  This early 1974 (serial # NA) bass guitar has an unusually dark fretboard with original neck binding, sometimes seen on the early 1974 models.  OHSC.    

Rickenbacker 1975 model 4000
bass guitar in Fireglo.  This guitar is in unusually fine condition with a deep, luminous Fireglo finish and near mint save a few surface impressions in the clearcoat.  This is a real treasure for someone looking for a model 4000 from this era, as many were played and played hard.  In the opinion of some, the lack of routing for the neck pickup provides added body stability and “twang” to the sound of the bass.  All original with OHSC.  

Rickenbacker 1975 model 4001 bass guitar in Walnut.  This bass has several interesting features: it is finished in an unusual “non-bursted” uniform Walnut finish; it is an early “black trim” model with white body and neck binding but black pickguard; and it has the rare black plexiglass truss rod cover, screened underneath with a white Rick logo.  This type of TRC was transitional for the black trim basses and was replaced the following year by the “raised letter” TRC still in use today.  A very clean example with OHSC.

Rickenbacker 1982 model 4003S-5 bass guitar in Jetglo. This 5-string bass guitar is reported to be one of five examples made by Rickenbacker for developing what would eventually become the standard production model 4003S-5 bass, first issued in 1986.  One of these prototypes was reportedly given by Rickenbacker to Chris Squire in 1982.  This prototype has several interesting features not found on the 5-string production model.  First is the super-elongated headstock, which is the same size as that of the 8-string bass, later produced starting in 1987. Next is the bridge configuration, which has five individual screw-thru intonation adjustment saddles, much like the 4005 or 6-string guitar models, in contrast to the standard Rickenbacker bass bridge for the 4001 and 4003 models. This bass also has many “S” type features:  unbound body, dot inlays on fretboard and toaster-top neck pickup; however, it has the dual Ric-o-sound input jacks, not normally found on “S” body basses.  OHSC.

   
 
 

Fender Guitars  (NOTE: Some images will enlarge when clicked again)
 
The Fender Vintage Olympic White Collection. You may notice that many of the Fenders instruments listed below are finished in the Olympic White custom color. This is no accident. My goal was to obtain one of each vintage model in Olympic White. So far I have at least one of each of the following models in Olympic White: Jazzmaster, Jaguar, Electric XII, Stratocaster, Mustang, Duo-Sonic I and II and Musicmaster I and II. I also have all of the ‘60s bass guitars in this custom color: P-Bass, Jazz Bass, Bass V, Bass VI and Mustang Bass. As far as I can tell, I am missing only a vintage Olympic White Telecaster, which would be quite hard to find in a standard ‘60s version. But I am still looking.
 
Jazzmasters - Original Finish

Fender 1959 Jazzmaster in Sunburst with gold anodized pickguard.  This guitar is in near mint condition and is a very fine example of the early Jazzmaster, a model introduced by Fender in late 1958.  The gold anodized aluminum pickguard was a feature of the earliest Jazzmasters; it was later replaced with multi-ply guards made of nitrocellulose in either tortoiseshell (usually for sunburst models) or white (often for custom-colored models).  The original concept behind this guitar was that there were separate “lead” and “rhythm” circuits, with separate pre-set controls each engaging both pickups; with a flip of a slider switch, the player could break from lead to rhythm mode and back; the rhythm channel T/V controls are two discreet “thumbwheels” located by the selector switch.   Comes with a very clean original tweed hardshell case with gold plush lining.

Fender 1959 Jazzmaster in Sunburst with gold anodized pickguard and a “slab board” (thick non-veneer rosewood fretboard, discontinued in late 1962). One way to tell a slab-board neck in a photo is by the slight convex arc where the bottom of the front headstock (natural or painted) meets the curve of the solid rosewood at the base of the headstock. (The more accurate way is by sighting down the fretboard at the bottom of the neck.)  Another example of this early model that shows some playing wear; very good plus condition. Comes with a very clean original tweed hardshell case with gold plush lining.

Fender 1959 Jazzmaster in Sunburst; slab board.  This guitar is a rare transition model that has a 2-tone sunburst finish more typical of an early 1958 Strat and an original white 3-ply guard; shows some playing wear.  Original brown tolex case with gold plush lining.

Fender 1961 Jazzmaster in Blonde with slab board.  Fender continued the tradition of it’s ‘50s “Tele Blonde” finish (also known as a “Mary Kay” finish on ‘50s Strats) in a few Jazzmasters, where the grain of the ash body shows through the translucent cream finish and is nicely complemented by the tortoiseshell pickguard.  This example is in very fine condition with a nice burl figuring to the maple neck and headstock; with original hangtag. The rosewood fretboard also has some very unusual dark/light figuring; shows some case wear on sides (many ‘60s Jazzmasters have rubbing wear on the sides because they were somewhat loose in their cases.)  Brown OHSC.

Fender 1961 Jazzmaster in Sunburst with slab board.  This example is in stunning condition with the grain of the ash body showing through the gorgeous tri-color Sunburst finish.  Perfect tortoise guard.  A time capsule.  Brown OHSC.

Fender 1962 Jazzmaster in Olympic White with matching painted headstock and tortoiseshell guard in very fine condition.   Fender started painting the headstocks of certain Jazzmaster models in the early ‘60s; this example is one of a few that have both a slab board and a painted headstock.  Brown OHSC.

Fender 1962 Jazzmaster
in Triple Gold with slab board and anodized guard.  Here’s one you won’t see many of and may never see again.  This was allegedly one of a factory run of 20 done in 1962 with Shoreline Gold painted body, gold anodized guard and gold hardware.  This guitar is in near mint condition except for some wear to the body paint, which appear to have been very thinly clearcoated.  Further adding to its rarity, the body wood appears to be Mahogany.  The gold hardware is immaculate and includes a gold trem arm.  This guitar is stunning in its original gold plush-lined brown tolex case.

Fender 1962 Jazzmaster
in Shoreline Gold with matching headstock and slab board. This example shows to good effect the combination of matching painted headstock and body with a slab board and the “green” nitrocellulose pickguard of the pre-CBS era of many early ‘60s Fender models.  It is also “oranged-out” at the top armrest contour.  Brown OHSC.

Fender 1962 Jazzmaster in Candy Apple Red.  Though the paint has chipped off on the edges of the headstock, but the body is in very fine condition.  A silver underpaint was applied to the CAR finish, which tended to make it more brittle around the edges.  An early non-slab board model.  White OHSC. 

Fender 1963 Jazzmaster in Black.  Unlike Rickenbacker, Fender had no jazzy or surf-oriented name for Black, though Black was a custom color.  This example appears all original, but it is almost too clean, so I’m not really sure; extra string tree added.  The headstock decal is typical of the Fender decal on the rare Black headstock; as the patent info and model designation on the Fender decals were black, the Fender decal applied to its guitars finished in Black simply stated “Fender.”  White OHSC.

Fender 1963 Jazzmaster in Dakota Red.  This is another stunning finish color with matching body and headstock complemented by a “green” nitro pickguard and original white HSC.  This shade of red is darker than the Fiesta Red (below), but in photos it may appear similar.  Shows some case wear rubbing on body sides.  White OHSC.

Fender 1963 Jazzmaster
in Sunburst.  This is one of my favorites because it was my first vintage Jazzmaster.  It is in spiffy condition, with the usual case-rub wear on the sides and a bit on the back contour –  and that cool white OHSC.  As those of you who own one may know, some of these old guitars have the coolest aroma – this one especially – of wood, leather, metal and – whatever.  When I open the case I get a whiff and go right back to the moment I first looked at this guitar.  Someone should bottle this stuff!

Fender 1964 Jazzmaster in Sonic Blue.  The finish on this guitar is a nicely greened-out blue that shows mucho playing wear, especially on the back. (It is also possible that this is Daphne Blue – another Fender custom color of that era that would be a shade darker than Sonic.)   It has transition knobs with the flared bottoms (for number display) with small chrome top inserts.  White OHSC.

Fender 1963 Jazzmaster in Blonde.  This model shows rugged playing wear around the bottom edges; “beat but sweet” as they say.  Contrast the wear on this example with the ’61 Blondie, above, in much nicer shape.  Brown HSC.

Fender 1965 Jazzmaster
in Sunburst.  This is a very clean example showing the transition logo introduced in early 1965 and with clay dot markers on the fretboard.  Black OHSC.

Fender 1965 Jazzmaster
in Lake Placid Blue.  One of the most sought-after of the ‘60’s custom colors, this example clearly shows the white undercoat where the top finish has chipped off.  Note also the “pearl dot” fretboard inlays that replaced the “clay dots” starting in mid-1965; this  is also one of the last “small headstock” examples;  notice also that most of the body finish color has “greened out,” whereas the headstock is “true blue.”  White OHSC.

Fender 1965 Jazzmaster
in Ice Blue Metallic, showing more “transition” features: neck binding, pearl dots, larger headstock, “F” neckplate.  Another custom color, this is among the rarer ones;  the finish shows some wear and weather checking.  Black OHSC.

Fender 1965 Jazzmaster in Olympic White.  This transition model has bound neck, pearl dots, larger painted headstock with ’65 transition logo and double-line Kluson tuners; “F” plate.  Shows horizontal weather checking, which is only noticeable on close inspection and shows some playing wear.  Black OHSC.  Can one have too many Olympic White Jazzmasters?  I say, “No!”

Fender 1966 Jazzmaster in Fiesta Red with the “block” fretboard markers that replaced the pearl dots in the post-CBS era beginning in 1966/67 and with all the other “transition” features mentioned above.  This guitar is in near mint condition and show no playing wear with a custom color finish that is uniform and unfaded throughout.  Nice black OHSC.  This is the one to have if you’re having only one!

Fender 1965/66 Jazzmaster in Candy Apple Red faded to Bronze.  This is a transition model showing yet another variation, as can be seen by the headstock decal with the “Jazzmaster” logo in larger script ending at the high “E” tuner. This logo design lasted through the ‘70s for the Jazzmaster model.  The finish on the front of this guitar has turned a uniform Bronze color; under the ‘guard and on the back, it is CAR.  The neckplate is a very late “L” series number, not an “F” plate; hence the 65/66 designation.  Black OHSC.

Fender 1966 Jazzmaster
in Ocean Turquoise with all the transition features except for block markers.  A very nice example of this rare custom color, acquired from the late Bob Jeniker of Park Avenue Music. Bob was a Jazzmaster collector par excellence and a true gentleman.  The white OHSC may not be period-correct, but it looks great with this custom color!  RIP, Bob.

Fender 1966 Jazzmaster in Candy Apple Red.  This example shows all the transition features of the era, including the block markers.  The headstock finish is quite weather-checked, as is part of the body.  Black OHSC.

Fender 1973 Jazzmaster in Olympic White, blocks and binding, natural headstock.  This example has the “F” tuners, introduced in 1966 for all models – some models sooner than others.  The Jazzmaster continued into the ‘70s, though many post-1967 examples are in Sunburst finish (with black pickguard).  Black OHSC.

   
 
   
Jazzmasters - Refinished

Fender 1960 Jazzmaster in Sherwood Green with matching painted headstock and slab board. Here’s the story: when I acquired this guitar the body had been stripped and the headstock partially stripped – all but the original decal and the green paint around it had been removed. It was professionally refinished in Sherwood Green, the color of the headstock paint, in nitrocellulose lacquer by Norm Isaac, who did restoration work for the Rock Hall of Fame in its early days. This is a rare color, especially for this era. The original decal and part of the original headstock paint is intact, as is evident in the photos. Other than the refinish, this guitar is all original with original “mint green” pickguard.  Brown OHSC with orange plush lining.

Fender 1960 Jazzmaster in Dakota Red.  I had a bit of fun with this one.  All original except for body refinish and reproduction gold anodized pickguard.  I thought the color combination looked great.  Comes with original Brown OHSC.

Fender 1961 Jazzmaster in Daphne Blue.  Here’s the story.  I acquired this guitar in its original state except the body had been badly refinished.  I was delighted to find that the refin did not extend to the body cavity, and the letters “DAFF” were written in pencil in the space between the pickups.  I also discovered that the words “Daphne Blue” were written on a piece of masking tape holding the pickup wires to the metal pickguard shield.  I had the body refinished to match the original Daphne Blue paint in the body cavity, of course preserving the original paint where found.  All original except for body refin, this is a classy guitar, plays great and is a piece of Fender history.  Brown OHSC with orange plush lining.

Fender 1962 Jazzmaster in Fiesta Red, refinished body only in nitro with original neck/headstock finish, slab board and original tortoise guard.  Though one usually associates a tortoise guard with a sunburst or blonde finish, this color combination is very striking and was often found with original custom-color finishes in the early ‘60s (see the Chinery collection).  OHSC.

Fender 1963 Jazzmaster
in Sea Foam Green, refinished body and matching headstock in nitro with original tortoise guard.  Another striking custom color nitro refin with original tortoise guard.  OHSC.

Fender 1964 Jazzmaster in Burgundy Mist, refinished body and matching headstock in nitro with original mint-green/white nitro guard.  I acquired this guitar in its refinished state; an original in this finish is almost impossible to find; this is considered to be among the rarest of the custom color finishes.  Black OHSC. 

Fender 1963 Jazzmaster in Fiesta Red.  The body, neck and headstock are refinished and it has a repro “mint green” guard.  It is still a ‘60s Jazzmaster with a clay-dot neck.  Brown HSC.

Fender 1964 Jazzmaster in Fiesta Red; body only refin; original neck and unpainted headstock finish with original “mint green” pickguard.  This guitar likely started its life as a custom color because of the original nitro white guard.  Somewhere along the way it was refinished in Fiesta Red, which is how it was when I found it.  White OHSC.

Fender 1965 Jazzmaster in Sonic Blue.  This one has a story, too.  I acquired an original 1965 Jazzmaster neck with original headstock finish and decal in Sonic Blue and matched it up with a loaded 1965 Jazzmaster body which I had refinished to match the headstock.  It turned out great.  Other than body refin and the repro mint green guard, this guitar is all period-correct.  The Sonic Blue color has faded to an almost mint green, as the clearcoat applied in the mid-1960s to Fender guitars tended to be thicker and “amber out” more frequently than the guitars finished in the early 1960s.  Black period correct HSC with orange lining.

Fender 1960 Jazzmaster in Ice Blue Metallic.  The body, neck and headstock are refinished and it has a repro “mint green” guard. What can I tell you?  This was my first foray into rehabilitating a Jazzmaster – in this case, someone had painted it with exterior house paint and the guard was MIA.  I got it for a song from a local dealer who had taken it in on trade.  I thought it would look cool in this custom color, but later learned that this finish color is not period-correct for 1960.  Nonetheless, the pro nitro refin job, also by Norm Issac, looks pretty good.  As was typical for some '59-'60 Fenders, the serial # is stamped on the bottom of the neckplate.  Brown OHSC.

   
 
   
Jaguar

Fender 1962 Jaguar in Fiesta Red.  The very rare original finish shows wear on the back, and the neck has some very nice figuring in the wood that is obscured by the heavy finish wear.  Still, a very unique example from 1962 in this rare custom color, the first year of production for the Jaguar.  White OHSC.

Fender 1962 Jaguar in Sunburst.  Another very early example in near mint condition with mute intact and with original “Jaguar” hangtag dated to 1962.  Brown OHSC.

Fender 1963 Jaguar in Sonic Blue with gold hardware.  Sonic Blue is one of the most sought after Fender Custom Colors from the pre-CBS era.  This stunning example has the added rarity of factory gold hardware, all the way down to the screws.  White OHSC.

Fender 1963 Jaguar in Sea Foam Green.  The finish on this guitar appears to be a nitro refin, but it was done so long ago that it looks original to me and shows normal playing wear.   White OHSC.

Fender 1964 Jaguar in Olympic White.  A very clean example with beautiful tortoise guard, mute intact and black OHSC.

Fender 1962/63 Jaguar in Blonde.  This example shows lots of playing wear; the wood grain in the ash body shows through the yellowed blonde finish.  Brown HSC.

Fender 1966 Jaguar
in Lake Placid Blue. This guitar has neck binding, pearl dots and “F” tuners and neckplate; some mild weather checking on the finish.  Black OHSC.

Fender 1966 Jaguar
in Olympic White.  Compare the “banana yellow” finish on this guitar with the pristine white finish on the 1964 Olympic White Jaguar, above.  Quite a difference!  The finish on this guitar has uniformly “yellowed out” and shows horizontal weatherchecking.  Larger headstock with “F” tuners and block fretboard markers.  Black OHSC.

   
 
 
Electric XIIs

Fender 1965 Electric XII in Olympic White with matching painted headstock; early example with “L” plate and Kluson double-line tuners; pearl fretboard dot markers.  Black OHSC.

Fender 1965 Electric XII in Lake Placid Blue with matching painted headstock; near mint condition; early example with “L” plate and Kluson double-line tuners; pearl fretboard dot markers; original hang-tag with guitar serial # written in faded ink.  Black OHSC.

Fender 1966 Electric XII
in Olympic White with matching painted headstock; finish has uniformly yellowed; stamped “SPECIAL” on exterior of neckplate joint; “F” tuners; pearl fretboard dot markers; mild finish checking on body. Black OHSC.

Fender 1966 Electric XII
in Candy Apple Red with matching painted headstock; “F” tuners; pearl fretboard dot markers; shows playing wear and finish checking.  Black OHSC.

Fender 1966 Electric XII with tortoise guard and body stripped to natural ash and clearcoated.  Plays great, all original except for body refin.  OHSC.

   
 
 
Basses

Fender 1960 Stack-Knob Jazz Bass refinished in Green Metal Flake.  All original except for body and headstock refin; neck, electronics and neckplate date to 1960.  Brown OHSC.

Fender 1962 Jazz Bass in Olympic White with tortoise guard and matching painted headstock.  All original and in excellent shape; comes with original hangtag with serial # written in faded ink.  White OHSC.

Fender 1963 Jazz Bass
in Olympic White with tortoise guard; body only refin with original unpainted headstock; neck shows playing wear.  Brown OHSC.

Fender 1964 Jazz Bass in Sunburst with tortoise guard.  This bass is a very nice example of a clay-dot “L” plate, pre-CBS Sunburst Jazz Bass.  Black OHSC.

Fender 1965 Jazz Bass in Olympic White with tortoise guard and matching painted headstock.  All  original and in excellent shape.  Black OHSC.

Fender 1962 Precision Bass in Sunburst with tortoise guard; significant playing wear to front and especially back; great vibe! Brown OHSC.

Fender 1965 Precision Bass in Olympic White with tortoise guard; pearl fretboard dots, “L” plate.  Shows mild playing wear but is in overall excellent condition.  Black OHSC.

Fender 1966 Bass V in Olympic White with tortoise guard.  This unusual bass has a long body and a short neck compared to a Jazz Bass (see photo), but is 1.5 inches longer overall and also has a full-length scale (just fewer frets!).  Unusual long neckplate with 600xxx serial number (found on all Bass V models).  A rare bird.  Black HSC.

Fender 1963 Bass VI
in Sunburst with tortoise guard; early “L” plate model; clay dots, Kluson “guitar” tuners; Jazzmaster-style bridge with threaded saddles; vibrato arm.  Black HSC.

Fender 1963 Bass VI in Olympic White with tortoise guard; another “L” plate model with clay dots; finish is in very nice condition; Mustang-style bridge with round saddles; tremolo arm.  Brown OHSC.

Fender 1966 Mustang Bass in Olympic White; “oval” tuning keys; shows some playing wear on back.  Gray OHSC.

Fender 1966 Mustang Bass
in Daphne Blue with original pearloid guard; nicely aged finish with no checking; “oval” tuners; original headstock decal states “Fender” only; could be prototype or very early production model.   Gray OHSC.

Fender 1974 Jazz Bass
in Natural, ash body; maple fretboard with pearloid block markers; white guard; four-bolt neckplate.  Black OHSC.

   
 
 
Stratocasters

Fender 1959 Stratocaster in Sunburst with original tortoise guard; slab board. The tortoise guard was confirmed as original by a nationally known vintage guitar appraiser. Tweed OHSC. Written in ink inside the case pocket is: “James Hendricks – 1962.”  Make of that what you will!

Fender 1962 Stratocaster in Olympic White with original “mint green” guard; old refinish and refret by Philip Petillo with sticker in neck pocket; brass bridge saddles; black Fender late-60’s HSC with orange/red lining. 

Fender 1964 Stratocaster
in Lake Placid Blue with original nitro guard; old pro body-only refinish in nitrocellulose lacquer; white OHSC with some markings and Maine music store badge on case exterior.

Fender 1971 Stratocaster in Olympic White; rosewood board; white guard; truss rod adjusts at body end; no skunk stripe; one of the last of the “4-bolt” neckplate Strats; white finish uniformly yellowed.  Black OHSC.

Fender 1973 Stratocaster in Natural with maple fretboard and white guard; ash body has nice grain; this guitar is in very nice shape; truss rod adjusts at headstock; two string trees, skunk stripe and three-bolt neckplate.  Black OHSC.

Fender 1973 Stratocaster in Sunburst with rosewood board; hardtail (string-through body, no tremolo unit); very nice shape with three-color sunburst.  Black OHSC.

Fender 1974 Stratocaster in Blonde finish; maple board; bridge cover; hardtail; very nice shape.  Black OHSC.

Fender 1974 Stratocaster
in original Black finish; rosewood board; hardtail; very nice original custom color Strat.  Black OHSC.

Fender 1974 Stratocaster in Sunburst finish; maple board; tremolo model with trem arm. Black OHSC.

   
 
 
Telecasters
Fender 1966 Telecaster in see-through Blonde finish with white guard; old body-only refin looks perfect; original Kluson tuners.  Black OHSC.

Fender 1971 Telecaster Custom in Sunburst with double-bound body;  maple neck, electronics and hardware are all original except body, which is from a Japanese import reissue, and tortoise guard.  Black OHSC.

Fender 1972 Telecaster in opaque Blonde; bridge cover; two string trees; very nice example.  Black OHSC. The last of the “4-bolt” neckplate Teles.

Fender 1972 Telecaster Thinline in see-through Blonde with maple board; two Fender humbucking pickups; F-hole in semi-hollowbody; four “witch-hat” V/T knobs with pearloid guard; near mint condition.  Three-bolt neckplate.  Black OHSC. 

Fender 1974 Telecaster Custom in see-through Blonde with maple board; one Fender humbucking pickup in neck position and one Fender single-coil Tele pickup in bridge position; four “witch-hat” V/T knobs with black guard; bridge cover. Black OHSC.
   
 
 
The Little Guys
Fender 1956 Musicmaster in White body-only refinish, all else original; gold anodized guard shows playing wear; short-scale guitar,“V” neck.  Beige OHSC.

Fender 1964 Mustang in Olympic White with tortoise guard.  This is a very early example of a pre-CBS Mustang with clay dots, “L” plate and 1964-dated neck and pots; guitar shows mild playing wear; no cracks or breaks or other issues; full-scale neck.  Beige OHSC.

Fender 1963 DuoSonic in Olympic White with tortoise guard.  This pre-CBS guitar has a short-scale neck, as contrasted with the DuoSonic II, below.  The design differences between the two DuoSonic models are interesting – see photo of both side-by-side.   Beige OHSC.

Fender 1966 DuoSonic II in Olympic White with tortoise guard.  The “II” designates this guitar as having a full-scale neck.  Gray OHSC.

Fender 1966 Musicmaster II in Olympic White with tortoise guard.  The “II” designates this guitar as having a full-scale neck.  Gray OHSC.
   
 
 
Gretsch Guitars  (NOTE: Some images will enlarge when clicked again)  
 

Preface:  The Gretsch guitars of the late ‘50s and early to mid-‘60s described below were produced with a dizzying array of features and variations.  I have tried to identify the main features of each guitar to the best of my knowledge.  I have deliberately stayed away, however, from describing the knobs and switches on each guitar and their respective functions, because some of them are simply beyond me. 

The source for much of the information is Gretsch – The Guitars of the Fred Gretsch Company by Jay Scott. I have also received information on some of these guitars from Ed Ball, author of a forthcoming book on the Gretsch Model 6120 (April 2010).

 
 

Gretsch 1957 Jet Fire Bird in Oriental Red with two DeArmond pickups, “hump-back” fretboard inlays, open-back Grover tuners, a Melita bridge and a Bigsby; no zero fret.  This model 6131 is in nice original condition; shows some playing wear on the mahogany back, which was painted black on this model in this era and termed “ebony” with typical Gretsch marketing overstatement.  Gray OHSC.

Gretsch 1958 Anniversary in two-tone Smoke Green, a single PAF Filter‘Tron pickup in the neck position, “space control” roller bridge and “G” tailpiece with “diamond” plate on headstock; no zero fret.  This model 6125, made to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the company, is in nice original condition with colors still vibrant.  You can’t beat this color combination with the matching guard!  Gray OHSC.

Gretsch 1959 Chet Atkins Tennessean in Cherry Red with a single PAF Filter’Tron pickup in the bridge position, “sign post” black pickguard, bar bridge and a Bigsby.  This model 6119 was the first version of the Tennessean (see below) and the little brother to the single-cutaway Chet Atkins 6120 (next). This example is in nice condition with gray OHSC.

Gretsch 1959 Chet Atkins
in Western Orange with two PAF Filter’Tron pickups, “sign post” pickguard, horseshoe inlay on headstock, gold hardware and appointments, open-backed Grover tuners, compensated aluminum Bigsby bridge and a Bigsby vibrola.  This example is in excellent condition with a uniform orange finish color and nice figuring in the maple body, front and back, with a body thickness of 2.5 inches.  The features on this guitar are almost identical to those on Brian Setzer’s original ’59 model 6120, making this an extremely desirable and rare guitar. Gray OHSC.

Gretsch 1959/60 Duo Jet
in Black with two PAF Filter’Tron pickups, “space control” roller bridge and “G” tailpiece; no zero-fret. This model 6131 was one of the last to be made without the zero-fret, introduced on this model in 1960.  It is in nice original condition and shows some playing wear on the mahogany back.  Gray OHSC.

Gretsch 1961 Chet Atkins 6120 in Western Orange with two PAF Filter’Tron pickups, “sign post” pickguard, horseshoe inlay on headstock, gold hardware and appointments, open-backed Grover tuners and a Bigsby vibrola.  This example is significant in that 1961 was the last year of production for the single cutaway 6120.  Also in 1961 the body thickness had been further reduced to a “thinline” 2.0 inches.  This example is in excellent condition with a uniform orange finish color and nice figuring in the maple body. White “Cowboy” OHSC with tooled leather edges.

Gretsch 1961 Chet Atkins Country Gentleman in Mahogany with gold pickguard; this was the last year for the single-cutaway model 6122 Gents.  Two Filter’Tron pickups, Grover Imperial tuners, bar bridge and Bigsby; painted-on F-holes; newer neck heel cap cover.  Nice original example with OHSC.

Gretsch 1962 Country Club
in Cadillac Green.  This “thin-line” version, new for the Country Club model in 1961, is rare in this color and is stunning with its gold hardware and appointments.  This model 6196 has two Filter’Tron pickups, Grover Imperial tuners, “dial-up” mute, a roller bridge, “G” tailpiece and snap-on back pad with access to interior through a port under the pad. The F-holes are real.  The combination of Cadillac Green finish color, Country Club thin-line body and dial-up mute make this a very rare guitar.  Gray OHSC.

Gretsch 1962 Jet Fire Bird in Oriental Red with double-cutaway, gold hardware and appointments, roller bridge, open-back Grover tuners, cloth backpad and Gretsch custom vibrola; except for a crack in the pickguard at the screw, this guitar is in great shape and is a veritable time capsule with ALL the related paperwork you could possibly imagine – except the original sales receipt!  Paperwork includes: four-page quality control checklist for this guitar and instructions, card on how to use the polishing cloth, blank warranty card, pickup schematic, “Action Flow” zero fret and nut information card, all in a neat Gretsch envelope with the guitar’s serial number written on it.  A feature seldom seen on this model is the snap-on cloth backpad, as there is no access port underneath.  Gray OHSC.

Gretsch 1962 Chet Atkins Tennessean
in a beautiful shade of Burgundy with two Hi-Lo ‘Tron pickups, silver pickguard with "Chet Atkins Tennessean," bar bridge, open-back Grovers, Bigsby and painted-on F-holes.  This example of the model 6119 Tennessean is in near-mint condition and has the same features as the one played by George Harrison; in 1964 a plate would be added to the headstock front with the “Tennessean” designation.    Gray OHSC.

Gretsch 1964 Chet Atkins 6120 in that great Gretsch Orange.  This double-cutaway model 6120 with gold appointments and hardware has a horseshoe inlay on headstock, single “flip-up” mute, back pad, bar bridge and Bigsby.  In this particular example, the two Filter’Tron pickups have gold-plated Hi-Lo’Tron surrounds.  This is mentioned in the Scott book as occurring at the factory in 1964 due to an occasional shortage of Filter’Tron surrounds.  In 1967, the double-cutaway 6120 would be named the "Nashville." This guitar is in very fine condition with the orange finish very strong and unfaded on the front; somewhat faded on the back. Gray OHSC.

Gretsch 1966 Viking in Cadillac Green – fully loaded with gold hardware and appointments – and much, much, more!  This transitional guitar represents the best of the early ‘60s Gretsch craftsmanship with the wackiest cutting edge ideas of its time – among them, the “floating sound unit” a/k/a the “tuning fork bridge.” This mechanism – located where the bridge should have been (the actual bridge was moved down) was supposed to result in increased sustain. Also on this model we find the newer Super’Tron pickups, a single flip-up mute, “space control” roller bridge, huge Grover “kidney-button” tuners and a backpad for playing comfort and access to internal controls.  The headstock plate says simply “Viking.” This particular example comes with a nice set of vintage paper, including a warranty certificate and quality control checklist for the guitar, a “space control bridge” card and, last but not least, a Gretsch “T-Zone tempered treble” card.  The “T-Zone” is the upper register of the fretboard on this model (also on the White Falcon), and was marked by treble-side dot inlays; starting at the 12th fret, the frets were angled one degree sharp!  Gray OHSC.

Gretsch 1967 12-String model in Sunburst.  This particular guitar says in tune very well and the action is set low.  The model 6076 features 2 Super’Tron pickups, wooden adjustable bridge, “G” tailpiece and headstock designed for 12 strings, true F-holes in a hollowbody and triangle fretboard inlays; Mike Nesmith of the Monkees played this model in a Natural finish.  This example is in very fine condition with a few areas of binding surface discoloration. Gray OHSC.

Gretsch 1967 Cats-Eye Electric in Black.  This rare guitar appears to have relatively mundane features:  Hi-Lo’Tron pickups, true hollowbody, Van Ghent open-back tuners, plain back, bar bridge and Bigsby.  What makes this model 6117 distinctive are the very cool “cats-eye” slash soundholes -- found only on the high-end acoustic Synchromatic models of the 1940s -- replacing the traditional F-holes in the body.  It also has a Gibson-style control layout, with a pickup selector switch and V/T controls for each pickup (and no standby switch).  Even for Gretsch, this model is an oddity. Gray OHSC. 

Gretsch 1967 Monkees model in opaque Red.  This model has two Super’Tron pickups with unusual double-thumbprint fretboard inlay and “Monkees” logo on pickguard, TRC cover and Monkees headstock nameplate.  Most of these were made in 1967; few were made thereafter; nobody in the Monkees played one. This guitar is similar in construction and features to the Streamliner and Rally models, introduced in 1967.  This example is in very nice condition with some playing wear on the back of the neck.  Gray OHSC.

Gretsch 1947 Model X75F Pre-Sierra Sunburst acoustic guitar
; although billed as a flattop with a single bound triangular sound-hole, the front and back of the body are molded like an archtop.  This model is finished in a dark, almost charcoal, sunburst with a solid black back and a headstock emblem that states “Gretsch 75.”  It is in great shape except for a slight center seam separation between the bridge and the end of the guitar.  Durable original seal-skin SSC.

   
 
 
Mosrite Guitars  (NOTE: Some images will enlarge when clicked again)  
 

Mosrite 1964 Ventures I in Metallic Blue, with sand-cast original Vibramute Tailpiece and “spun” knobs;  neck adjustment at body end; brown “alligator” OHSC.

Mosrite 1965 Ventures I
in Candy Apple Red, Moseley TP, “spun” knobs, neck adjustment at body end; brown OHSC.

Mosrite 1965 Ventures I in Lipstick Red, Moseley TP, “M” knobs, neck adjustment at body end; brown OHSC.

Mosrite 1965 Ventures I
in Black, white lettering on black headstock; Moseley TP, “M” knobs, neck adjustment at headstock end; brown OHSC.

Mosrite 1966 Ventures I in Sunburst, white lettering on black headstock; Moseley TP, “M” knobs, neck adjustment at headstock end; horizontal finish checking throughout; some wear on sunburst neck finish; brown high-quality reproduction OHSC.

Mosrite 1965 Ventures XII
12-string in Candy Green, Moseley TP, “M” knobs, neck adjustment at body end; brown high-quality reproduction OHSC.

Mosrite 1965 Ventures II in White; early version of Mark V; horizontal finish checking throughout; Moseley TP, “M” knobs, neck adjustment at body end; gray OHSC.

Mosrite 1966 Ventures Mark V
in Pacific Blue; horizontal finish checking throughout; Moseley TP, “M” knobs, neck adjustment at headstock end; gray OHSC.

Mosrite 1967 Joe Maphis 12-string
in Natural with tortoise pickguard; “M” knobs, fixed tailpiece; very fine condition with black OHSC. 

Mosrite 1967 Joe Maphis Doubleneck 6/12 in Pearlescent White with tortoise guards; very fine condition with mild finish checking; some extra strap buttons as shown; brown “alligator” OHSC. 

Mosrite 1968 Bass
, Metallic Blue, two pickups with bridge cover intact; shows some playing wear; black HSC.

Mosrite Ventures Guitars with Mosrite Amplifier

   
 
 
Gibson Guitars  (NOTE: Some images will enlarge when clicked again)  
 

Gibson 1956 Les Paul Junior in Sunburst.  This guitar is “beat but sweet,” show playing wear but no cracks or breaks and is structurally sound.  This guitar plays and sounds fantastic with its single P-90 pickup and original “wrap” bridge/tailpiece.  Comes with a newer ‘70s Gibson HSC and its original “gator” SSC, still intact.

Gibson 1955 Les Paul Special
in Blonde.  This guitar has a great blonde finish and shows some playing wear; great sound with two P-90 pickups and original wrap bridge/tailpiece.  Newer brown Custom Shop HSC with pink lining.

Gibson 1962 Melody Maker in Sunburst.  This was the entry-level Gibson for those of us who were teens in the 1960s; one single-coil pickup with wrap bridge/TP; double cutaway.  Very nice shape with no issues; front has fine finish-checking throughout; nicely figured rosewood board. Note the extremely narrow headstock.  Comes with a new black HSC and its original brown “gator” SSC in passable condition.

Gibson 1961 Les Paul SG Junior
.  Cherry finish somewhat faded in front; new SG-style “double cutaway”; shows some playing wear on sides of neck; screen logo partially worn off headstock; one P-90 pickup.  Newer brown Custom Shop HSC with pink lining.

Gibson 1962 SG Special.  This guitar was purchased from a collector and it looks like it was made yesterday.  Except for very slight wear on top of headstock and some light pick marks on the guard, this example is in mint condition:  bright, rich Cherry finish with everything spotless; two P-90 pickups.  Mint black OHSC with gold lining. One of the first SG examples made without the "Les Paul" logo on the headstock; Gibson discontinued its endorsement relationship with Les Paul in 1962.  A time capsule.

Gibson 1962 Les Paul SG Standard
.  The Cherry finish on this guitar is in excellent condition; comes with two humbuckers and low action; the nickel hardware is a bit tarnished from normal playing wear. A terrific sounding guitar that is structurally solid -- no cracks, breaks or excuses.  Standard long “sideways” vibrola with folding arm, typical of high-end Gibsons of this era; comes with original hang tag and some original factory papers. Note the "Les Paul" truss rod cover, soon to disappear from this model.  Black OHSC in excellent shape with gold lining.

Gibson 1961 Les Paul SG Standard.  An early production  model with slight playing wear; note the neck/body joint with slightly different construction than the 1962 model.  Black OHSC in excellent shape with gold lining.

Gibson 1963 Les Paul SG Standard.  This the vibrola was removed from this guitar and a stop-tailpiece added for playability – this guitar has been played. Neck heel repair.  All original otherwise Black OHSC in excellent shape with gold lining.

Gibson 1963 SG Junior in White. Lots of  finish-checking and honest playing wear on this all-original guitar; no cracks or breaks; one P-90 pickup provides the sound.  Black HSC.

Gibson 1966 ES-335
in “Ice-Tea” Sunburst.  Plays very nicely with two humbuckers and trapeze tailpiece and tune-o-matic bridge with nylon saddles; block inlays; tuners changed to Grovers.  Black HSC with gold lining.  The 335, 345 and 355 models are termed “semi-hollow” because a hardwood center block is added to the interior of the body, under the pickups and bridge, to increase sustain (and weight), as opposed to, for example, the 330 model, which is a “true” hollowbody and is noticeably lighter with the same scale length.

Gibson 1966 ES-335 in Cherry.  This example has factory Kluson tuners with plastic “tulip” buttons, block fretboard inlays and humbucking pickups and a Bigsby vibrola. Some finish checking.  Black OHSC with gold lining.

Gibson 1965 ES-345 in Ice-Tea Sunburst.  Very clean; gold hardware slightly tarnished by playing wear; functioning Varitone switch; two humbuckers and trapeze tailpiece; block inlays; original tuners.  Black OHSC with gold lining.

Gibson 1967 ES-345 in Cherry.  Nice clean cherry finish; gold hardware slightly tarnished by playing wear; functioning Varitone switch; two humbuckers and trapeze tailpiece; block inlays; tuners are period-correct gold Kluson repros.  Black OHSC with gold lining.

Gibson 1967 ES-355
in Cherry.  Very clean guitar; gold hardware (including Bigsby vibrola) slightly tarnished by playing wear; five-ply bound tortoise guard and matching armrest added;  original Varitone switch functional; two humbucking pickups.  Newer brown Custom Shop HSC with pink lining.

Gibson 1958 ES-225T
in dark Sunburst.  Original combo trapeze tailpiece with “wrap-around” bridge; single P-90 pickup in middle position; very clean with no issues; newer black HSC.  This model was considered one of the first of Gibson’s “thinline” series, hence the"T" in the model designation.  Steve Cropper’s first guitar was an ES-225T (it's on display at the R 'n' R Hall of Fame).

Gibson 1961 ES-125TC
in Cherry Sunburst.  This guitar has a single P-90 pickup in the neck position, a tortoise guard and its original “moveable” archtop bridge; Bigsby vibrola.  Black OSSC.

Gibson 1967 ES-125TDC in Cherry Sunburst.  This guitar has two P-90 pickups in the neck and bridge positions, a tortoise guard and a fixed bridge with trapeze tailpiece.  Black OSSC.

Gibson 1966  ES-330 in Cherry.  A true hollowbody, this guitar has two P-90 “dog ear” pickups (one chrome and one nickel) and trapeze tailpiece.  Transitional example with no issues; black HSC with gold lining. The mid’60s Epiphone Casino (also made by Gibson) is structurally similar to this guitar, and was a favorite among the Beatles while touring. 

Gibson 1970 ES-175 in Ice Tea Sunburst with darker sides and back.  One of Gibson's most popular thick-bodied archtop electric guitars, this example of the ES-175 is a transitional model with no volute (standard starting in 1970) but “Made in USA” stamped on headstock back (also a 1970 addition); two humbuckers with the new-for-1970-style "hash-mark" tailpiece, which is actually a throwback to the design of TPs used on other archtop models in the '40s and '50s.  Black OHSC with gold lining.

Gibson 1966 EB-3
in Cherry finish.  This two-pickup solidbody bass is in very good shape with great action and a rotary pickup selection switch; also comes with working “slideable” mute.  Newer Gibson ‘70s HSC.

Gibson 1967 EB-2
in Cherry finish.  The finish on this one-pickup hollowbody bass is in excellent shape and the bass is very solid structurally.  Newer black HSC.

Epiphone by Gibson 1963 Professional Model with dedicated amplifier.  Gibson, which acquired Epiphone in 1957, designed this guitar equipped with the controls normally found on an amplifier.   Known as the Professional, this guitar was essentially a thinline hollowbody with f-holes, one mini-humbucker pickup in the neck position – and a variety knobs and switches mounted on the pickguard.  The companion amplifier had only a volume control and an output cord, permanently wired to the amp, with a multi-pin connector that plugged into the Professional, which was also wired with a standard output jack. Due to its configuration, the amplifier could not be used with any other guitar. This is a rare model, with approximately 400 made.  OHSC

   
 
 
Guitars - Other  (NOTE: Some images will enlarge when clicked again)  
 
National

National 1963 Val-Pro 84 Map Guitar in Arctic White.  Res-o-glas body construction with vinyl strip around body edge; wooden neck with white headstock sporting “National” logo; one pickup in neck position with second piezo pickup under bridge; quarter-circle fretboard inlays; “National ValPro” pickguard; 3-on-a-side special Grover tuners with oversized triangular buttons; excellent condition with hard-to-find gray form-fit OHSC. Shown side-by-side with bass version, next item.         

National 1963 Val-Pro 85 Map Bass in Ermine White.  Appointments generally match those of Map Guitar; one pickup in neck position with second piezo pickup under bridge; no pickguard and one finger -rest on each side.  Black Gibson HSC with white plush lining which perfectly fits this bass.  Quite a pair! 
           
National 1963 Newport 84 Map Guitar in Sea Foam Green.  One pickup in neck position with second piezo pickup under bridge; quarter-circle fretboard inlays; “National ValPro” pickguard; original vibrato unit; very nice condition.  Black wooden OHSC.   

National 1962 Studio 66 Guitar in Beige.  Unique art-deco designed body with one pickup in bridge position; dot fretboard markers; black headstock with “National” logo.  Black HSC.   

Airline by National/Supro 1965 “Jetsons” Guitar in Red with white trim.  Angular shaped guitar has two “regular” pickups and res-o-glas body construction with wooden neck;  block fretboard markers; white headstock with “Airline” logo.  Black wooden OHSC with white ends.               

   
 
 
Kay

Kay 1958 Barney Kessel Artist in Sunburst.  Top of the line Kay full-bodied archtop with “Kelvinator” headstock; original Grover tuners and ID plate on back of headstock intact; two tissue-box pickups and two bound full F-holes; Melita bridge; fixed “lattice” tailpiece; checkered binding and block fretboard markers; “Barney Kessel” pickguard; in excellent original condition.  Brown OHSC.

Kay 1964 Swingmaster III in Sunburst.  Thinline archtop; three tissue-box pickups and one bound full F-hole; body-mounted metal bridge with six individual rollers; fixed harp tailpiece;  triangular metal badge headstock logo with “K”; checkered binding and block fretboard markers.   Black HSC.

Kay 1962 Swingmaster II in Sunburst.  Thinline archtop, two tissue-box pickups and two bound full F-holes; wooden bridge; plain headstock “K” logo; checkered binding, block fretboard markers.   Black HSC.

Kay 1964 Galaxie in Sunburst.  Thinline, one tissue-box pickup in neck position; smaller F-hole; wooden bridge; triangular metal badge headstock logo with “K”; “guitar pick” fretboard inlays.  Brown and white OSSC.

Kay 1959 Sizzler in “Asphalt” finish.  Cool deco solidbody guitar made of “Plextone” with one pickup in neck position, Kay logo on headstock, large angular cream guard; maple fretboard with black dot markers; wooden bridge and simple tailpiece.  Brown ‘gator OSSC.

Kay 1960 Style Leader in Blonde finish.  Bound semihollow body guitar made of laminated curly maple with three pickups and two textured brushed copper guards, one per side (some tarnishing); bound rosewood board with black dots; plastic “Kay” headstock logo; 3-on-a-side Klusons with black plastic buttons.   Black OSSC.

Airline by Kay 1959
in Sunburst.  Like Swingmaster, except Bigsby bridge and vibrola, no F-holes and 3-ply body binding. Flamed maple body; three tissue-box pickups; block fretboard markers; master volume knob; original pickguard with “A” emblem; "Airline" on headstock; open-back tuners.  Black and white OSSC.

Airline by Kay 1961 in Blonde, deluxe model.  Early “Speed Demon” styling with double cutaway semihollow body with two smaller F-holes; highly flamed maple front and back; two tissue-box pickups; special deco “V” Bigsby-style vibrola with gold inset; wooden bridge; 4-ply body binding;  “guitar pick” fretboard inlays.  Black HSC.

Airline by Kay 1962
in Blonde, deluxe model.  Early “Speed Demon” styling with double cutaway semihollow body with one smaller F-hole; highly flamed maple front and back; three tissue-box pickups; wooden bridge and trapeze tailpiece; 4-ply body binding; “guitar pick”  fretboard inlays.  Black HSC.

Silvertone by Kay 1956 in Cherry Sunburst.  Thick-bodied 17 inch-wide archtop resembles early Kay “Upbeat” model.  Cream plastic Silvertone headstock veneer with shield, original cream guard with “S”; two adjustable pickups; single-ply body binding, block fretboard markers; Bigsby vibrola.  This guitar is in excellent original condition.  Black HSC.

Silvertone by Kay 1956 “Thin Twin” Jimmy Reed model in Cherry Sunburst.  Thick-bodied double-bound semihollow body with cream plastic “Silvertone” headstock veneer and pickguard with shield; flamed curly maple body with mahogany sides; two lipstick-style (“thin”) pickups; block fretboard markers;  removable "TS" decal on pickguard; wooden bridge and trapeze tailpiece.   Black HSC.

   
 
 
Harmony

Harmony Rocket 1965 in Red (model H56).  Single-cutaway hollowbody guitar with two DeArmond “moustache” pickups, wooden bridge, two F-holes and vibrato; dot fretboard markers.  Black OSSC.

Harmony Silhouette 1966
in Redburst (model H19).  Deluxe solidbody guitar (bearing a striking resemblance to a Fender Jaguar) with Hagstrom vibrato and bridge, two DeArmond “moustache” pickups; Fender-style headstock; block fretboard markers; in excellent original condition.  Black and white OSSC.

Harmony Bass 1966 Solidbody in Redburst (model H25); companion in appearance to Silhouette, as shown in side-by-side photo.  One DeArmond pickup; flip-up string mute; Fender-style headstock; block fretboard markers; two push-button tone controls. In near mint condition.  Black and white OSSC.

Harmony Bass 1965 in Sunburst (model H22).  Hollowbody bass with one DeArmond pickup in neck position, “batwing” white pickguard; 2-on-a-side plain Kluson tuning machines (guitar-sized); dot fretboard markers; rectangular peghead.  Black OSSC.

Harmony Stratotone Mercury 1962 in Redburst (model H47).  Doublebound hollowbody with one DeArmond pickup in neck position; wooden bridge; block fretboard markers; large white guard;  “atomic” logo on headstock.  Black and white OSSC.

Silvertone by Harmony Stratotone Jupiter 1960 in Black speckled with gold (like model H49).  Doublebound hollowbody with two DeArmond pickups; wooden bridge; block fretboard markers.  Very cool “S” shaped white guard on side with tone/volume and blend controls and 3-way switch labeled in tiny letters on guard.   Black and white OSSC.

Airline by Harmony Roy Smeck Stratotone 1963 in Sunburst.  Doublebound hollowbody distinguished by multi-pointed cream colored “star” pickguard surrounding the three DeArmond pickups;  wooden bridge; block fretboard markers. Six tone/volume controls mounted directly on guitar body with 3-way selector switch.  Black and white OSSC.

Harmony Bobkat guitars (2) in Sunburst and Redburst (1965). Solidbody guitars with two DeArmond pickups; Fender-style headstock; dot fretboard markers and vibrato on Redburst. Also shown is side-by-side comparison of Sunburst Bobkat with same model made for Silvertone, below.  Black and white OSSCs.

Harmony Bobkat guitars (2) in Blue and Red (1967). Solidbody guitars with two DeArmond pickups; Fender-style headstock; dot fretboard markers and vibratos.  Black and white OSSCs.

Silvertone by Harmony Bobkat 1966 in Sunburst with original Sears packaging! Solidbody guitar with two DeArmond pickups; Fender-style headstock;  dot fretboard markers and vibrato.  Comes in original Sears cardboard box with shipping label and price tag!  Time capsule, mint condition.  

   
 
 
Danelectro

Silvertone by Danelectro U2 1956 Tan and Ginger “Peanut” body guitar, one lipstick-style pickup model (Silvertone 1359).  Simulated leather (vinyl) finish, shows playing wear on back of neck; “Coke bottle” headstock shape; metal nut.  Brown ‘gator OSSC in good condition.

Silvertone by Danelectro U1 1959 Brown “Peanut” body guitar, one lipstick-style pickup; short-scale model (Silvertone 1452).  Simulated leather (vinyl) finish, shows playing wear on back of neck; “Coke bottle” headstock shape; beautifully figured Brazilian rosewood fretboard; metal nut.  Gray OSSC in good condition.

   
 
 
Hagstrom
 — Special Models

Hagstrom Corvette 1964 Cherry Sunburst with three pickups; full set of space-age push-button controls (see photos, words cannot do them justice); set-neck construction; “King’s Neck” plastic truss rod cover; Van Ghent tuners; very clean example with only a few minor dings around body edges; they don’t (dare) make them like this any more. Comes with blue/black alligator hide OHSC with red lining and case pocket containing original amp cord, Selmer polish cloth, case keys and adjustment tools.  Have you ever seen another like this? 

Hagstrom Impala 1966 Brown Sunburst  with two pickups; full set of space-age push-button controls; set-neck construction; “King’s Neck” plastic truss rod cover; Van Ghent tuners; very clean example with a few dings and scrapes around body edges. Unique precise form-fit gray OSSC (with “tail”) in excellent condition. 

Hagstrom Futurama 1963 in Black with two pickups and white molded plastic guard; resembles early Hagstrom II guitar; this guitar was purchased from a UK seller and has the rare “Futurama” headstock decal (this model was marketed as “Futurama” in UK and distributed there by Selmer, “Kent” was the US version); Van Ghent tuners; “King’s Neck” sticker on back hdstk;  light playing wear.  Black SSC. 

Hagstrom II 1963 in Red; early “Kent” model with white molded plastic guard; two pickups; “King’s Neck” sticker on back hdstk; very nice condition; with unique blue-weave tweed-like OHSC with light blue lining. 

Hagstrom III 1964 in Blue; “Kent” model with white molded plastic guard; plastic “Hagstrom” logo on body; three pickups; Van Ghent tuners;  “King’s Neck” sticker on back hdstk; very nice condition; with gray form-fit OSSC. 

Hagstrom I 1964 in Lavender; extremely rare color; silver “pool” between pickups;  Kent body style; plastic “Hagstrom” logo on body; lucite body front screwed onto wooden body with cream colored vinyl backing in good shape; vinyl is worn in one spot in horn area; back of neck and headstock are finished in black; “King’s Neck” sticker on back hdstk; open back tuners with plastic-buttons; two pickups.  Black SSC. 

Hagstrom II 12-string1966 in Black with two pickups and black pickguard; Van Ghent tuners.  Black molded plastic HSC. 

Hagstrom Viking 1972 with highly charactered Bubinga body; original Grover Imperial tuning machines; no flaws or dings; very nice example; near mint condition.  Black OHSC as new. 

Hagstrom I 1963 bass in Black; very clean early model with plastic “Hagstrom” logo on body; silver pool between two pickups;  lucite front screwed onto wooden body with black vinyl backing in good shape and lacquered; back of neck and headstock are finished in black; Van Ghent tuning machines; “porpoise” Kent headstock shape with no decal (correct for this model); original gray/blue form-fit SSC with “tiger stripe” plush lining; excellent plus condition. 

   
 
 
 — Standard Models

Hagstrom I 1965-66 guitars (4) in Blue, Black, White and Red; silver or gold “swimming pool” between pickups; lucite body front screwed onto wooden body with vinyl backing matching color of guitar front; back of neck and headstock are finished in black; open back plastic-button tuners; two pickups; gig bags. 

Hagstrom II + III 1965-67 guitars (3) in Blue, Red and Black with black pickguards; two or three pickups as shown; Van Ghent tuners. OHSCs. 

Hagstrom Viking 1967 guitar
in Red; some finish checking; Van Ghent tuners; shows some moderate playing wear; excellent condition  Brown HSC.

Hagstrom I 1966-67 basses (2) in Red and White; gold pool between two pickups;  lucite front screwed onto wooden body with red vinyl backing (on both); back of neck and headstock are finished in black; Van Ghent tuning machines. Gray OSSCs.

Hagstrom II 1966-67 basses
(3) in Sunburst, White and Black; black guards; Van Ghent tuning machines.  Cases as shown.   

Hagstrom Viking “Concord” 1967 hollowbody bass in Sunburst; one finish ding on back near binding; very nice example; near-mint condition. Black OHSC as new.      

   
 
 
Paul Reed Smith

PRS Custom 24 1986 in Cherry Sunburst.  This guitar is from the 2nd year of production of PRS guitars, before the “10” top rating system.  The intense burled maple underneath the flamed cherry burst is easily an “11” grade top, with blue undertones difficult to capture in photos.  Near mint condition.  Black OHSC.

 
 
   
 
 
 

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